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Posts Tagged ‘stamina’

The Magic Behind Burning Fat Like Crazy

I was watching a show on the boob tube yesterday called ‘Magicians secrets revealed.’  It was amazing to see behind the curtain of these seemingly impossible tricks.

But there was a way to do it.

Getting the energy, physique and fat loss results we want can sometimes seem that way too.  It seems like magic that some people can do it and others can’t.

Well, I’ve spent many years learning about that magic trick.

And I’m about to pull back the curtain for you now.

Regarding exercise, nothing burns blubber and builds lean muscle like bodyweight exercises.  There’s those magic moves again.

It goes back to all the extra physical and neurological development we’ve talked about with moving your own body through space.

The Eastern bloc sports scientists proved decades ago that this form of training produced many superior results – one of which was much increased fat burning.

When your body has to develop all the extra smaller muscles, the tendons, ligaments… better and new wiring for coordination, balance and ambidexterity… your cardiovascular system… strength, flexibility and mobility… all at the same time…  your metabolism goes through the ROOF!

That’s why we see a greater hormone (including anti-aging hormones) and fat burning response from bodyweight training.  Especially at higher repetitions and with the more multi-dimensional moves that fully engage the spine.

Here’s another little secret for you:  There’s one particular spinal exercise that not only activates many important glands, but it really enlivens and balances the thyroid.  And the health and vitality of your thyroid is KEY to fat loss.

A coach I greatly admire, Matt Furey, also showed me how to add deep breathing to this exercise and calls it the most effective form of Chi Gung.  It develops a POWERFUL calmness, energy, an in the flow state of mind, extra stamina and hormonal health.

Did you know that most of the fat we burn off leaves through our breath?

Yep, sure does.  Oxygen is the furnace.

A lot of people have lost 20lbs or more with Pam Grout’s ‘deep breathing for higher metabolism’ alone.  What are you going to do with deep breathing combined with the best oxygen increasing, hormone jacking and fat burning exercises on the planet?

We go through this routine in detail in The Next Level Sports Program.  It’s called NEXT LEVEL for good reason… it’s WAY ahead of the curve.

Order today, and see the fat melt off you like butter on a frying pan.

Yours,
Brian Timlin

www.nextlevelsportsprogram.com

NFL great Hershel Walker was ‘weak, slow and uncoordinated’ until he did this…

As a boy in Georgia, NFL great Hershel Walker was called ‘weak, slow and uncoordinated’ by coaches and other kids.

He couldn’t keep up and he used to get beat on.

But then he discovered a secret:

If he exercised like the animals on their farm he got super strong, agile, flexible, mobile and quick – all at the same time!

Soon he was passing out all the other kids.

He kept on training this way.  He built up these movements to huge reps per day.  He did push ups, pull ups, bridges, sit ups and variations of these year after year.

herschel-walker

Herchel became truly extraordinary.  He ended up with a 5th degree black belt in Taekwondo, he was an Olympic bobsledder, he danced with the Fort Worth ballet and he was a track and field champion in college… on top of being arguably the greatest college footballer of all time and a future hall of fame inductee in the NFL!

HOLY CRAP!

One curious thing also happened when he was playing in the NFL:

Nearly all sportspeople train with weights, and his team was no different.  So one day Hershel was in the team weights room doing his own thing and one of the players/coaches asked him to do some of the weights exercises… the bench press, shoulder press, squats and so on.

To their amazement Herschel out lifted them all!

He didn’t even DO weights.

That’s how strong bodyweight exercises at high reps made him.

He was known for his running power and speed.  The combination made him deadly… and he swore by his exercise regime.

I can also attest to the power of using your own bodyweight.  I tried all kinds of exercises, but nothing came close to moving my own body.

A lot of people think golf requires very little athleticism.  Nothing could be further from the truth.

You can get away with extra timber and not so great cardio to an extent (there’s more than one buffet molester on tour). However, you have to be limber, strong and have a diamond set of shoulder, spinal, pelvic and hip muscles to play good golf.

Natural bodyweight movements stretch and really strengthen these areas!  It also activates and powers the core and glutes like no other.  These factors are athleticism 101… and taken up to elite level with only 4 to 6 comprehensive ancient exercises.

The result is swinging a golf club is much easier than before.  Not to mention the ball bombs off the face with ease.

One of the sayings among those who really know golf is… ‘the athlete usually wins.’  Well, nothing makes you more athletic than mastering your own bodyweight.

Obviously practise, mentality and technical proficiency are huge too, but if you body isn’t strong and mobile enough these important body movements are diminished or don’t happen at all.

You can be great mentally and putt well, but it’s hard to compete with guys that bomb it straight and pure iron shots at the flag.  All things being equal its the main difference you see between the top players at the club and the other guys.

It’s the same with EVERY sport.  Let’s get real here: Players with power, speed, agility, coordination and balance on another level are basically unplayable!

Actually, one of the things about having a great mentality is putting your mind to improving or even mastering the elements of your craft.

So yea, sport is still 90% mental… but not in the way most people say it is!

Make this the day you zoom past the others like Herschel Walker did… from a position where he was told he ‘can’t.’  Order The Next Level Sports Program today and learn how you can do this and much more.

Everyone can start where they are and improve day by day to amazing results they didn’t think were even possible.

That’s what I’ve experienced, and so can you.

Yours,
Brian Timlin

P.s.  I like what many institutes like the Titleist Performance Institute are doing, but they are giving people watered down movements that don’t really get to the root of power and mobility.  To get a major advantage over your competitors click here

Why you are probably very deficient in Magnesium and how it is critical to good health and sports performance

Picture a man living in a cottage in a forest, near a river.  He’s surrounded by the elements.  There’s a lot to be said for it.

Every day he eats fresh greens, he catches fish and eats them.  He exercises and does meditative type things that relax his mind and body.  His health is probably a lot better than most.

The reason being he’s getting what he needs to nourish, remove toxins and de-stress.

 

Regarding the nourishment part greens, fish and fresh mineral water are high in magnesium.  Most of us in the modern world are deficient in magnesium (many of us are severely deficient), and it is so important.  It is needed for regulating no less than 300 biochemical reactions in the body.

Magnesium deficiency is a significant factor — often the major factor — in many severe illnesses including heart attacks and other forms of heart disease, asthma, anxiety and panic attacks, depression, fatigue, diabetes, migraines and other headaches, osteoporosis, insomnia, and most cases of muscular problems.” Dr. Steven Johnson puts it better: “The range of pathologies associated with Mg deficiency is staggering: hypertension (cardiovascular disease, kidney and liver damage, etc.), peroxynitrite damage (migraine, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Alzheimer’s disease, etc.), recurrent bacterial infection due to low levels of nitric oxide in the cavities (sinuses, vagina, middle ear, lungs, throat, etc.), fungal infections due to a depressed immune system, thiamine deactivation (low gastric acid, behavioral disorders, etc.), premenstrual syndrome, Ca deficiency (osteoporosis, mood swings, etc.), tooth cavities, migraines, hearing loss, diabetes type II, cramps, muscle weakness, impotence, aggression, fibromas, K deficiency (arrhythmia, hypertension, some forms of cancer), Fe accumulation, etc.”

The modern diet contains water that has had many of the natural minerals taken out from treatment and recycling, and we eat far less greens and fish than before.  Also, a lot of the vegetables we do eat have come from land that is not fully remineralised, because most large farms use man-made fertilisers that are only high in the minerals that make crops grow bigger (and are deficient in the other macro minerals like Magnesium and all the micro minerals).

This issue has been compounded by rudimentary conventional magnesium testing that is actually inaccurate to your true magnesium levels.  Most doctors and laboratories don’t even test for it, and if they do they only look at the blood.  Only 1% of the body’s magnesium is in the blood, the rest is in the tissues.

So, the bottom line is most of us need to address this problem ourselves.  The first thing you can do is make sure you are eating more greens and fish.  If you have a lot of the symptoms of magnesium deficiency the second thing you can do is supplement.  Check after a number of weeks to see if it has benefited you.

Magnesium can be difficult to supplement because taking it orally is not the best way for it to absorb and at higher doses it also loosens the stools.  My advice is to supplement transdermally, rub it on your skin.  There is a oil/gel available from a company called Ancient Minerals.  Their products are available at ancient-minerals.com and magnesium.ie .  It’s very hard to overdose magnesium as most people are very deficient and excess is usually either not absorbed or removed from the body.

Ancient Minerals magnesium chloride is extracted from the Ancient Zechstein Seabed in Europe, 1600 to 2000 meters deep in the interior of the Earth. Well protected for the last 250 million years, it is the most pure magnesium in the world.

I’ve found this supplement fantastic in my own health and I’m sure it would of great benefit to most other people as well.

One other thing, magnesium increases Atp (energy, speed, stamina), is one of the best anti-inflammatories (if not the best) and helps your muscles to relax.  Do you think it might help your training, recovery and sports performance as well?

Don’t get left behind is my advice.  Lather that stuff all over your body before and after training (especially where it is most needed).

The man living in a cottage in the forest doesn’t have an iphone, but he’d probably kick all our butts in living in a way that makes him fit, healthy and happy.  Smartphones and the internet are great in some ways and we don’t have to live in a forest, but let’s be far more like that guy and not king of the rats in the rat race (the ill-health and death race).

Let’s get back to living in a way that is in tune with our nature!

Does jogging make you slow?

Yes and no.

If you only jog for a number of months then you will get considerably slower. I experienced this myself first hand lately. I started playing soccer again after years and years of not playing, aside from maybe one game per year.

I was still speedy in those intermittent games (so long as I wasn’t socialising the night before), no pace had been lost. My stamina had been very poor though, because I’d only been strength training, playing golf and watching my diet.

This year I wanted to also get great cardiovascular fitness as well. So I added jogging three times per week to my regime.

I’m starting to play soccer regularly now. Stamina has improved considerably on the pitch, but I can’t believe how much pace and speed I’ve lost. I can keep on going and going, but my ability to keep up intense work (work capacity) and speed are almost non-existent.

So I’ve learned from this and have added sprinting and interval work into my regime. My speed is coming back and the better work capacity should follow soon as well.

To be honest, it’s not a bad idea to build an aerobic base of stamina first, because first and foremost you need to be able to keep going and also it helps your recovery from hard sessions.

As disappointed as I was with my loss of speed, the fact is I probably gave a better overall performance than the days when I had the speed, but lacked stamina.

Even when slow, I’d arrive in goalscoring positions and get back to defend a lot more, and this gives you more chance to use your hopefully decent skills and finishing. I also had more in the tank than other players as the game wore on, and started to influence the game more and score more.

It’s not easy to go straight into a full fitness regime so maybe this was a decent approach. However, I’m happy the speed is coming back. It’s a great thing to have, not just for running, but it also hugely helps your ability in having quick feet for skills and tackling.

The plan I have now is to play two 1.5-2 hour five a side games per week and do one tempo interval session as well, to cover aerobic fitness. All other sessions will be based on skills, strength, speed, agility and flexibility.

I’m replacing all jogging with the games and a tempo interval session, which is running repeats at 75% of max for 10 seconds and resting a minute or until heart rate goes to 130 bpm, and doing this for 15 to 30 minutes depending on if it is a light or full session. This is basically aerobic training done by easier sprints and work capacity training. It’s not full out intervals, which are great for work capacity, and it’s not jogging either. It’s intervals for aerobic capacity and some work capacity.

This is what sprinters do for conditioning. They are afraid of jogging causing a loss of speed and so am I now!
However, I’m not sure jogging would have any effect on speed so long as you maintain your sprint and speed work. Some boxers and mma fighters maintain blinding speed with regular jogging on top of their speed routines, so that suggests it isn’t a problem if not done in isolation.

But it may be better for athletes that need maximum speed to stick to games and tempo intervals. It is something to consider, it may be more specific to the needs of certain types of sports. In soccer for example, it is all bursts and recovery, which is more suited to tempo intervals and outright speed training on top of games and regular training.

All in all this is something that needs consideration. If you want to build an aerobic base from scratch you are probably better starting with walking alternating with jogging and building up to jogging. However, if you also need or want speed, then beware that this cardio work alone will take all speed away (over a period of months).
Have speed work as part of your routine as well, if so required.