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Posts Tagged ‘conditioning’

Playing Touch Butt With That Dork in the Park

There’s a tribe in the Amazon and they are circling around a campfire… wearing animal heads… and making loud rhythmic noises.  They are prancing like animals and doing something that looks like Tai Chi – a meditation in movement.  It is all so connected to the natural cycle of life.

Modern living has moved away from this.

There are great things in our world.  However, a lot of the conventional technologies and lifestyles have moved faster than how WE are designed.  We’ve gotten away from our natural flow.

You can be sure as hell those tribes are a lot healthier and physically fit than most people.  They also have a lot less stress.

The world health organisation (WHO) estimates that stress is the cause of most illness in society… and it’s growing.

This is because we’ve lost our natural evolutionary way.

Yes, child mortality is much better our developed nations.  We also have more resources and knowledge in dealing with emergencies.

But boy oh boy are we bad at managing chronic health issues.  It’s out of control.

A lot of getting back that control will be in keeping what is resourceful in modern life and stripping back the rest of it.  It is also about regaining many of our natural instincts, practises and rhythms.

This includes diet, workouts, less passive behaviours (like watching the boob-tube)… and cleaning our cup (as they say in the East) or taking some time each day to refresh our mind.

HOW we do these things can lead to very different results too, as many of THOSE practises have also gone away from our natural evolution.

When Conor McGregor fought Nate Diaz there was some very entertaining trash talk back and forth.  One of the things Nate said was, ‘You’re playing touch butt with that dork in the park with the pony tail’… or something to that effect.

He was referring to videos of Conor training with Ido Portal in the park in skimpy MMA gym shorts.  They were being creative with slow Tai Chi and animal type movements in a simulated sort of dual.  Ido Portal calls that drill ‘movement riddles.’

It looks so different that some people ‘pooh pooh’ at it and other such methods.

There are many that go so far to say that Conor is still a fake, that he is all promotion and no substance… even when he has two UFC world titles in two separate divisions.  He also won them in spectacular fashion.

His method is so far ahead that it looks effortless.  Even most experts can’t figure out how calm, poised, skilled and brilliant he is in the octagon.  They can’t understand how he seemingly touches high level fighters and they crumble.  They continue to back against him.

Then some none the wiser fans even go so far as to talk about ‘dives.’

It’s precision, timing and internal power.  When you have such control of your own body… it’s much easier to translate that into effortless power.  For the same reasons he can also use unorthodox approaches, angles and strikes depending on the situation.

The reason he’s so far ahead of his peers is how he thinks about life, sport and how he trains.

He’s very much in his natural flow in all areas; mentally, physically and emotionally.

What I will say to you is this…  I’ve studied training and sport for years.  Near the end of my research for my last book, a couple of years ago, I knew I’d gotten some very large chunks of the puzzle.

I came across Ido Portal and realised he was doing a lot of what I was finding (he does a lot more than touch-butt).  Then I came across McGregor and realised he was doing pretty much ALL of it.

I had a hunch he was going right to the top and fast… or had a great chance based on his training.  When I saw more of his fights I was even more convinced.

The way he trains applies to anyone, even if you just want health… but it will give you a LOT more than that.

I’ve finished many of the experiments I was continuing even this year (to confirm concepts and methods) and have started applying it with amazing results in my own life.  I only did bits and bobs of it in the last year at various times for my golf… and when I did… I won 6 high level medals or trophies, including an All Ireland medal, and a provincial event player of the year that contained many of the top players of my district or province.

I’ve started the full program now for the coming season (early next year).

When I was trying things out to test certain matters… and went away from what works… my form TANKED.  I even injured myself for a few months.

There are always ups and downs when you are truly learning and going towards goals.

Make mistakes, but LEARN.  That’s how you really move forward.

Nature… of… the… beast.

I’ve learned my lessons, will come back stronger and improve to new levels again in the new season.  Will you?

If you apply this knowledge, you too will also experience superb results.

You will be literally connecting back to how you are wired and you can apply this to health, energy, success and zooming up your results in just about any area of life… especially sports.

This is your time.  Click here to order The Next Level Sports Program today.

Yours,

Brian Timlin

Does jogging make you slow?

Yes and no.

If you only jog for a number of months then you will get considerably slower. I experienced this myself first hand lately. I started playing soccer again after years and years of not playing, aside from maybe one game per year.

I was still speedy in those intermittent games (so long as I wasn’t socialising the night before), no pace had been lost. My stamina had been very poor though, because I’d only been strength training, playing golf and watching my diet.

This year I wanted to also get great cardiovascular fitness as well. So I added jogging three times per week to my regime.

I’m starting to play soccer regularly now. Stamina has improved considerably on the pitch, but I can’t believe how much pace and speed I’ve lost. I can keep on going and going, but my ability to keep up intense work (work capacity) and speed are almost non-existent.

So I’ve learned from this and have added sprinting and interval work into my regime. My speed is coming back and the better work capacity should follow soon as well.

To be honest, it’s not a bad idea to build an aerobic base of stamina first, because first and foremost you need to be able to keep going and also it helps your recovery from hard sessions.

As disappointed as I was with my loss of speed, the fact is I probably gave a better overall performance than the days when I had the speed, but lacked stamina.

Even when slow, I’d arrive in goalscoring positions and get back to defend a lot more, and this gives you more chance to use your hopefully decent skills and finishing. I also had more in the tank than other players as the game wore on, and started to influence the game more and score more.

It’s not easy to go straight into a full fitness regime so maybe this was a decent approach. However, I’m happy the speed is coming back. It’s a great thing to have, not just for running, but it also hugely helps your ability in having quick feet for skills and tackling.

The plan I have now is to play two 1.5-2 hour five a side games per week and do one tempo interval session as well, to cover aerobic fitness. All other sessions will be based on skills, strength, speed, agility and flexibility.

I’m replacing all jogging with the games and a tempo interval session, which is running repeats at 75% of max for 10 seconds and resting a minute or until heart rate goes to 130 bpm, and doing this for 15 to 30 minutes depending on if it is a light or full session. This is basically aerobic training done by easier sprints and work capacity training. It’s not full out intervals, which are great for work capacity, and it’s not jogging either. It’s intervals for aerobic capacity and some work capacity.

This is what sprinters do for conditioning. They are afraid of jogging causing a loss of speed and so am I now!
However, I’m not sure jogging would have any effect on speed so long as you maintain your sprint and speed work. Some boxers and mma fighters maintain blinding speed with regular jogging on top of their speed routines, so that suggests it isn’t a problem if not done in isolation.

But it may be better for athletes that need maximum speed to stick to games and tempo intervals. It is something to consider, it may be more specific to the needs of certain types of sports. In soccer for example, it is all bursts and recovery, which is more suited to tempo intervals and outright speed training on top of games and regular training.

All in all this is something that needs consideration. If you want to build an aerobic base from scratch you are probably better starting with walking alternating with jogging and building up to jogging. However, if you also need or want speed, then beware that this cardio work alone will take all speed away (over a period of months).
Have speed work as part of your routine as well, if so required.