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Posts Tagged ‘anti-aging’

Discipline is a Beautiful Thing

Many people have a go at mixed martial arts, the military, boxing… and things like that.

I take the opposite view.

Safety in mma and boxing is proven to be better than the nfl and rugby, and similar to hockey.

True, if a trained fighter beats the hell out of a civilian for looking at him sideways… or a president sends an army to level a population for oil or money… it is despicable, deplorable.

But that’s a human and society problem, not a martial arts or military one.  They are about being the best you can be – a path to discipline, confidence, and purpose.  Great commodities.

For every thug that uses his skills to assault an innocent, there are thousands that were taken away from violence, gangs and drugs – and put in a positive direction.

The military and sports are also on the cutting edge in terms of learning and performance.  These discoveries can then be brought to the wider public – for the betterment of mankind.

One of those areas is nutrition;  an important key to mastering oneself.

Enter George Lockhart.

George was the nutrition specialist in the US marine core.

When operatives needed to fuel properly for missions, when they needed to cut weight or gain weight or increase performance… they would knock on George’s door.

It wasn’t long before word was spreading into the sporting arena.

MMA fighter and former marine Brian ‘All American’ Stann came to George Lockhart and asked him if he’d help him cut weight for his next fight.

They worked together, and Brian never found it easier to make weight or perform better.  Then Jon Jones came to the party.  Many more followed.  The latest ones being Holly Holm and Conor McGregor, who describe GL as a genius.

That he is.  He’s not just the best in the MMA business, he’s the best in the business.

I’ve never come across anyone who lays it out so well and so exactly.

He talks about three factors:  Fueling the body with exactly what it needs when it needs it, staying ahead of hunger… and controlling hormones.

That way you’re not fighting your body.

It doesn’t react with hunger hormones or fat retaining hormones (in reaction to starvation and other problems).

The result is being able to eat good portions, at regular intervals… even when losing weight.

There is no ambiguity.  You eat this at this time, in this amount…  then this will happen over the next week.  Boom.

‘Your day is different today…’  ‘Okay, here’s what you do’… down to the gram and the minute.

‘Your workout will be 45 minutes and will be at this intensity’…  ‘Okay, here’s exactly how you fuel it.’

Now there’s a guy that knows his stuff.  My kind of guy.

I’ve tried so many diets.  Many were good.  Some were revolutionary and worked like a charm… to a point.

But there was never a perfect solution.  It was never comprehensive or exact enough… probably because they hadn’t things wrapped down tight enough.

There were always some sort of concessions involved, usually to do with diminished purr-formance.

So I tried George’s plan.

He created this software called FitnessVT.  You log in your goal, your activity level for that day, your workouts etc.

And each morning you enter your weight before you eat.  It spits out exact instructions for the day, as per his algorithms.

It takes all sorts of things into account, even down to balancing sodium/potassium and calcium/magnesium ratios, which play a role in performance, health and even weight loss.

You can swap foods you don’t like or don’t have, for similar ones.

It’s just the thing I wanted for a long time.  In four weeks I’ve burned 8 pounds of fat, without losing any muscle… and it was pretty easy.  I hadn’t much to lose, so it is even more impressive.  I feel great and I know exactly what to do every step of the way, without having to work it out.

I can’t recommend this higher, and believe me I don’t recommend things lightly.

If you want to eat heartily, eat well and reach any weight, fat loss, muscle gain or performance goal… you’ve just found the solution.

Best,

Brian Timlin

www.precisionphysique.com

www.nextlevelsportsprogram.com

P.S.  Other than looking and feeling better than you ever have, here’s what else you can look forward to: balanced hormones, increased anti-aging hormones, youthful skin, drastically reduced inflammation, increased energy, well being and better recovery.

It’s no good abfabulising and buttsculpting like a fitness model if you’re doing it via drugs or starvation. Eventually, it will all crumble. Even good diets, like intermittent fasting (when it is done correctly), ketogenic diets or carb backloading usually have some difficulties and/or concessions involved.

With this method, everything just gets better… it’s totally sustainable and it works for every person – 100% of the time.

P.S.S.  FitnessVT is so good that many elite fighters that work with George also comment that they just have to use the software and don’t even need his personal assistance.

It’s all they need.  It’s all you will ever need too.

Get on board today and it will change your life forever

Is ‘everything in moderation’ good advice?

A scientist has some vegetation in the lab.  He takes a sliver of one of the greens, makes a slide and looks at it through his microscope.  He sees a collection of cells.

When you break it down, that is what we are too, along with our genetic blueprint for our cells.  Assuming you have a normal genetic blueprint, your health will then come down to that which effects cellular health.

So is ‘everything in moderation’ good advice in relation to this?

Yes and no.

It’s a good idea, but it’s also a vague one.

There was a study done stating the one thing that long lived people usually have in common is that they do things in moderation.

The concept being that if you do everything in moderation then that is the best way to live.  It’s good advice in that way, but it’s also useless to most people.

It sounds to me, while this was a valid conclusion in many regards, that the study was lacking in depth and awareness of many critical factors (and so completely left them out).

While its true that our health, well being and longevity is best served by not overdoing or underdoing work, exercise, play, partying etc… don’t we already know this?  I mean wouldn’t you expect that the longest lived people will nearly always not have done extreme things in their life.

But most people don’t do extreme things and yet illness, cancer and heart attacks are very common and have increased markedly over the last century.

What’s the real difference?

If you take an individual who feels fine, but unwittingly has health issues that will accumulate over time and end up in an illness at some point (and it could be in 20-30 years), telling him to do ‘everything in moderation’ is probably not going to help him.

Here’s why:

He/She is probably already doing things reasonably and in moderation.  If you take an average 40 year old person; they work 40 hours a week, don’t drink alcohol too often, have hobbies they enjoy and eat reasonably well.

I don’t want to be grim, but that person, on average, will experience a lot of health issues at some point.

This is the norm from an ‘everything in moderation’ point of view.  So it’s a largely meaningless statement.

What’s meaningful is physiological stress and epigenetics (physiological stressors flipping bad genes on and good genes off).

A person’s current and future health will be determined by that.  It will also influence longevity and heavily influence quality of life in later years. We can also be totally unaware that our body is very stressed.

So what influences physiological stress?

– Traumatic memories, negative beliefs/interpretations (these are usually subconscious, so again we can be totally unaware of them).  WHO estimates that 85% of all illness is caused by stress.  Psychologists conclude that most stress is caused by unhelpful interpretations and/or actions in relation to those.  Consequently, this factor is probably the biggest influence on health and well being.

– Chronic lack of certain nutrients (macro or micro), which is far more common than realised, even in developed countries

– Eating too much (adequate nutrients but a balanced calorie intake is required)

– Excess adipose tissue or body fat

– Bacteria, virus, fungus (you can have a large pathogen load that is causing havoc that can be hard to detect for nearly all physicians, they can even be inside cells)

– Environmental toxins which can accumulate in tissues

– Too much or too little work

– Too much or too little physical exercise

– Bad habits and addictions

– And so on.

 

There are ways to successfully address all of these factors, but the point is that this is the make or break with health, well being, longevity and quality of life in later years.  These are the concrete issues.  I would say in most cases ‘everything in moderation’ will ignore these things, and so won’t do the job.

The longest lived and healthiest people in the world are the Okinawans.  They live on a secluded island off Japan.

They meditate and exercise daily, eat fish, chicken, seaweed, vegetables and rice from lands that they naturally replenish with nutrients.  They don’t overeat.  They also disregard treating symptoms with toxic pharmaceuticals and instead use natural medicines to help facilitate the body to heal itself without side effects.

Five times as many Okinawans live to be 100 years old as their compatriots elsewhere in Japan – and Japan has the highest life expectancy of any country.  Okinawans also usually die of old age and not from any disease (they have drastically different rates of illness and prolonged illness to the west). Therefore, they usually have a high quality of life right up to when they die.

They also have many fighters in their 90’s, who are still able to whoop guys half their age!  In other words, they also retain strength, speed and flexibility a lot more than their counterparts in other nations.

Could it be that they have a great weather system, are wealthy, have unique genes or are secluded from infectious diseases?

The weather is no different to lots of places.

Okinawa is poor – Japan’s poorest region in fact. It has had its fair share of hardship – it has been invaded many times over the centuries and suffered heavy losses in the second world war. Studies suggest that when they emigrate, Okinawans quickly lose their health advantages – which means it’s not about genetics.

Unfortunately, their lifestyle is also starting to change as other influences come into their culture.

However, if we go back to factors that cause physiological stress and successfully address those things we can mimic their results and even better them!

I go into these factors and how to address them in a lot more depth in my report, The Health and Energy Code, click here for more information.

Why the brain is the most important ‘muscle’ in the body

In sport, training, and physique building everyone talks about strength, speed and muscularity, but the truth is a lot deeper than that. It’s really about the brain and then we branch out from there.

Everything we do is controlled from the brain. If we develop the brain, we develop everything else.
You may think I’m full of it at this point, but hear me out.

When you strength train you are commanding your brain to create a denser network of neurons that create better wiring that travels down to your muscles, to make them contract harder.

When you develop a skill you are doing the same thing, except this time you are developing fine motor skills or hand eye coordination or movement patterns. All of the above come under the bracket of procedural memory. Your brain is learning to do something better, putting the blueprint in place mentally and in your neurological system, to do it automatically. It is creating more dense networks and faster wiring for certain tasks. It will also create the necessary hormones, body fluids, building blocks to do that task.

This is one of the reasons that I talk about focusing on the muscles you are using in a strength exercise, because it switches the brain on more; and the more of your brain that is engaged, the more you will gain from the workout.

Let’s take this one step further though:
What if we super engage the brain? How could that impact strength training, physique and hand eye coordination?

A lot, as it happens.

So how do we really light up the brain?

Well more of the brain’s cortex is taken up with the hands than any other part of the body. If we develop our hand eye coordination and hand-forearm strength then we are really lighting things up in the grey matter. If we also do that while working ambidextrously we are really taxing (and developing) our brain.

This will make you better at just about every other thing you do.

This is why it is important to play sport, especially ones that require a lot of coordination. Ever notice how much easier it is to do a lot of running when you are playing a game or a match? More of your brain is switched on in chasing the ball, controlling the ball, doing skilled tasks, keeping an eye on opponents, the pattern of play and just having fun etc. Therefore it will provide more of its abilities and resources to help you improve. As a result, you’ll get a lot more from it.

We’ve always sort of known that sport is important to society, but now we are getting more ‘proof’ through neuroscience. We learn a lot about personal development and team work by sport. We also learn about competing. However, we are also directly developing our brain in many different ways and increasing our blood flow to the cerebrum.

The effects of this are far reaching into all aspects of our lives. This will help you in just about every area.

So take up a sport or two, a team sport or a team and individual sport and also try to develop your skills ambidextrously. The greats are nearly always good on both sides or play the opposite way to their natural dominance. Check it if you don’t believe me: Ronnie O’Sullivan, the most talented snooker player of all time, is ambixdextrous. Rafa Nadal in full fitness at his peak was untouchable, he even beat Federer on grass at that point, and he’s right handed but plays left handed. All the great soccer players are either two footed or left footed in a righty world. Tiger Woods is left handed but plays right, Ben Hogan was left handed but played right, Phil Mickelson is right handed and plays left. The best soccer goalkeeper of all time, Peter Schmeichal played handball as a kid (you have to use and develop both arms to play handball). The left side of the body is connected to the right brain and vice versa, and both sides of the brain have abilities the other side doesn’t. We want to engage and amplify all areas and also communication across the hemispheres as much as possible. If the spacial awareness, rhythm, vision, reasoning, interpersonal, sensory, impulse control, and decision centers are all switched on and communicating… skill level is greatly heightened. The greats with ambidexterity are using more of their brains!

This isn’t inbuilt either, it is about development. Then it looks like it is natural two sidedness, but there’s no such thing. There are many accounts of people who acquired an injury to one side and over time developed the other side to be just as good. And of course, as stated earlier, many of the great sportspeople play the opposite side to their usual dominance. If you develop both sides your brain creates that motor cortex structure, if you neglect one side it never develops.

This is another reason why bodyweight exercise trumps repetitive weights routines. You have to learn to control your own body, balance and coordination to do bodyweight exercises correctly. They are also bilateral as they get harder, in other words you start to do them one side at a time (like a one arm push up).

You can also greatly develop your memory directly, and memory is connected to everything you do. You have images for how to do simple tasks, complex skills, for how things work, for things you’ve learned etc.

There was once a study done of London black cab drivers before and after they had memorised 25,000 streets. Their hippocampi region of the brain was 10% bigger after! The brain is very much changeable and very adept at learning skills if you practise them. It will literally change its structure to get better.

So when not playing sport but doing a simple exercise (like push ups or running etc.), you can also recite the capitals of the world or something else you’ve memorised. You’ll find that you actually accomplish more physically because more of the brain is switched on. You are creating more hormones and your neurons are connecting and communicating more across the regions of the brain. This makes you better at everything.

So start using more of your brain, it will lead to greater results in all areas of your life!