Search

Posts Tagged ‘addictions’

Is ‘everything in moderation’ good advice?

A scientist has some vegetation in the lab.  He takes a sliver of one of the greens, makes a slide and looks at it through his microscope.  He sees a collection of cells.

When you break it down, that is what we are too, along with our genetic blueprint for our cells.  Assuming you have a normal genetic blueprint, your health will then come down to that which effects cellular health.

So is ‘everything in moderation’ good advice in relation to this?

Yes and no.

It’s a good idea, but it’s also a vague one.

There was a study done stating the one thing that long lived people usually have in common is that they do things in moderation.

The concept being that if you do everything in moderation then that is the best way to live.  It’s good advice in that way, but it’s also useless to most people.

It sounds to me, while this was a valid conclusion in many regards, that the study was lacking in depth and awareness of many critical factors (and so completely left them out).

While its true that our health, well being and longevity is best served by not overdoing or underdoing work, exercise, play, partying etc… don’t we already know this?  I mean wouldn’t you expect that the longest lived people will nearly always not have done extreme things in their life.

But most people don’t do extreme things and yet illness, cancer and heart attacks are very common and have increased markedly over the last century.

What’s the real difference?

If you take an individual who feels fine, but unwittingly has health issues that will accumulate over time and end up in an illness at some point (and it could be in 20-30 years), telling him to do ‘everything in moderation’ is probably not going to help him.

Here’s why:

He/She is probably already doing things reasonably and in moderation.  If you take an average 40 year old person; they work 40 hours a week, don’t drink alcohol too often, have hobbies they enjoy and eat reasonably well.

I don’t want to be grim, but that person, on average, will experience a lot of health issues at some point.

This is the norm from an ‘everything in moderation’ point of view.  So it’s a largely meaningless statement.

What’s meaningful is physiological stress and epigenetics (physiological stressors flipping bad genes on and good genes off).

A person’s current and future health will be determined by that.  It will also influence longevity and heavily influence quality of life in later years. We can also be totally unaware that our body is very stressed.

So what influences physiological stress?

– Traumatic memories, negative beliefs/interpretations (these are usually subconscious, so again we can be totally unaware of them).  WHO estimates that 85% of all illness is caused by stress.  Psychologists conclude that most stress is caused by unhelpful interpretations and/or actions in relation to those.  Consequently, this factor is probably the biggest influence on health and well being.

– Chronic lack of certain nutrients (macro or micro), which is far more common than realised, even in developed countries

– Eating too much (adequate nutrients but a balanced calorie intake is required)

– Excess adipose tissue or body fat

– Bacteria, virus, fungus (you can have a large pathogen load that is causing havoc that can be hard to detect for nearly all physicians, they can even be inside cells)

– Environmental toxins which can accumulate in tissues

– Too much or too little work

– Too much or too little physical exercise

– Bad habits and addictions

– And so on.

 

There are ways to successfully address all of these factors, but the point is that this is the make or break with health, well being, longevity and quality of life in later years.  These are the concrete issues.  I would say in most cases ‘everything in moderation’ will ignore these things, and so won’t do the job.

The longest lived and healthiest people in the world are the Okinawans.  They live on a secluded island off Japan.

They meditate and exercise daily, eat fish, chicken, seaweed, vegetables and rice from lands that they naturally replenish with nutrients.  They don’t overeat.  They also disregard treating symptoms with toxic pharmaceuticals and instead use natural medicines to help facilitate the body to heal itself without side effects.

Five times as many Okinawans live to be 100 years old as their compatriots elsewhere in Japan – and Japan has the highest life expectancy of any country.  Okinawans also usually die of old age and not from any disease (they have drastically different rates of illness and prolonged illness to the west). Therefore, they usually have a high quality of life right up to when they die.

They also have many fighters in their 90’s, who are still able to whoop guys half their age!  In other words, they also retain strength, speed and flexibility a lot more than their counterparts in other nations.

Could it be that they have a great weather system, are wealthy, have unique genes or are secluded from infectious diseases?

The weather is no different to lots of places.

Okinawa is poor – Japan’s poorest region in fact. It has had its fair share of hardship – it has been invaded many times over the centuries and suffered heavy losses in the second world war. Studies suggest that when they emigrate, Okinawans quickly lose their health advantages – which means it’s not about genetics.

Unfortunately, their lifestyle is also starting to change as other influences come into their culture.

However, if we go back to factors that cause physiological stress and successfully address those things we can mimic their results and even better them!

I go into these factors and how to address them in a lot more depth in my report, The Health and Energy Code, click here for more information.