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Archive for the ‘Diet’ Category

Discipline is a Beautiful Thing

Many people have a go at mixed martial arts, the military, boxing… and things like that.

I take the opposite view.

Safety in mma and boxing is proven to be better than the nfl and rugby, and similar to hockey.

True, if a trained fighter beats the hell out of a civilian for looking at him sideways… or a president sends an army to level a population for oil or money… it is despicable, deplorable.

But that’s a human and society problem, not a martial arts or military one.  They are about being the best you can be – a path to discipline, confidence, and purpose.  Great commodities.

For every thug that uses his skills to assault an innocent, there are thousands that were taken away from violence, gangs and drugs – and put in a positive direction.

The military and sports are also on the cutting edge in terms of learning and performance.  These discoveries can then be brought to the wider public – for the betterment of mankind.

One of those areas is nutrition;  an important key to mastering oneself.

Enter George Lockhart.

George was the nutrition specialist in the US marine core.

When operatives needed to fuel properly for missions, when they needed to cut weight or gain weight or increase performance… they would knock on George’s door.

It wasn’t long before word was spreading into the sporting arena.

MMA fighter and former marine Brian ‘All American’ Stann came to George Lockhart and asked him if he’d help him cut weight for his next fight.

They worked together, and Brian never found it easier to make weight or perform better.  Then Jon Jones came to the party.  Many more followed.  The latest ones being Holly Holm and Conor McGregor, who describe GL as a genius.

That he is.  He’s not just the best in the MMA business, he’s the best in the business.

I’ve never come across anyone who lays it out so well and so exactly.

He talks about three factors:  Fueling the body with exactly what it needs when it needs it, staying ahead of hunger… and controlling hormones.

That way you’re not fighting your body.

It doesn’t react with hunger hormones or fat retaining hormones (in reaction to starvation and other problems).

The result is being able to eat good portions, at regular intervals… even when losing weight.

There is no ambiguity.  You eat this at this time, in this amount…  then this will happen over the next week.  Boom.

‘Your day is different today…’  ‘Okay, here’s what you do’… down to the gram and the minute.

‘Your workout will be 45 minutes and will be at this intensity’…  ‘Okay, here’s exactly how you fuel it.’

Now there’s a guy that knows his stuff.  My kind of guy.

I’ve tried so many diets.  Many were good.  Some were revolutionary and worked like a charm… to a point.

But there was never a perfect solution.  It was never comprehensive or exact enough… probably because they hadn’t things wrapped down tight enough.

There were always some sort of concessions involved, usually to do with diminished purr-formance.

So I tried George’s plan.

He created this software called FitnessVT.  You log in your goal, your activity level for that day, your workouts etc.

And each morning you enter your weight before you eat.  It spits out exact instructions for the day, as per his algorithms.

It takes all sorts of things into account, even down to balancing sodium/potassium and calcium/magnesium ratios, which play a role in performance, health and even weight loss.

You can swap foods you don’t like or don’t have, for similar ones.

It’s just the thing I wanted for a long time.  In four weeks I’ve burned 8 pounds of fat, without losing any muscle… and it was pretty easy.  I hadn’t much to lose, so it is even more impressive.  I feel great and I know exactly what to do every step of the way, without having to work it out.

I can’t recommend this higher, and believe me I don’t recommend things lightly.

If you want to eat heartily, eat well and reach any weight, fat loss, muscle gain or performance goal… you’ve just found the solution.

Best,

Brian Timlin

www.precisionphysique.com

www.nextlevelsportsprogram.com

P.S.  Other than looking and feeling better than you ever have, here’s what else you can look forward to: balanced hormones, increased anti-aging hormones, youthful skin, drastically reduced inflammation, increased energy, well being and better recovery.

It’s no good abfabulising and buttsculpting like a fitness model if you’re doing it via drugs or starvation. Eventually, it will all crumble. Even good diets, like intermittent fasting (when it is done correctly), ketogenic diets or carb backloading usually have some difficulties and/or concessions involved.

With this method, everything just gets better… it’s totally sustainable and it works for every person – 100% of the time.

P.S.S.  FitnessVT is so good that many elite fighters that work with George also comment that they just have to use the software and don’t even need his personal assistance.

It’s all they need.  It’s all you will ever need too.

Get on board today and it will change your life forever

Is ‘everything in moderation’ good advice?

A scientist has some vegetation in the lab.  He takes a sliver of one of the greens, makes a slide and looks at it through his microscope.  He sees a collection of cells.

When you break it down, that is what we are too, along with our genetic blueprint for our cells.  Assuming you have a normal genetic blueprint, your health will then come down to that which effects cellular health.

So is ‘everything in moderation’ good advice in relation to this?

Yes and no.

It’s a good idea, but it’s also a vague one.

There was a study done stating the one thing that long lived people usually have in common is that they do things in moderation.

The concept being that if you do everything in moderation then that is the best way to live.  It’s good advice in that way, but it’s also useless to most people.

It sounds to me, while this was a valid conclusion in many regards, that the study was lacking in depth and awareness of many critical factors (and so completely left them out).

While its true that our health, well being and longevity is best served by not overdoing or underdoing work, exercise, play, partying etc… don’t we already know this?  I mean wouldn’t you expect that the longest lived people will nearly always not have done extreme things in their life.

But most people don’t do extreme things and yet illness, cancer and heart attacks are very common and have increased markedly over the last century.

What’s the real difference?

If you take an individual who feels fine, but unwittingly has health issues that will accumulate over time and end up in an illness at some point (and it could be in 20-30 years), telling him to do ‘everything in moderation’ is probably not going to help him.

Here’s why:

He/She is probably already doing things reasonably and in moderation.  If you take an average 40 year old person; they work 40 hours a week, don’t drink alcohol too often, have hobbies they enjoy and eat reasonably well.

I don’t want to be grim, but that person, on average, will experience a lot of health issues at some point.

This is the norm from an ‘everything in moderation’ point of view.  So it’s a largely meaningless statement.

What’s meaningful is physiological stress and epigenetics (physiological stressors flipping bad genes on and good genes off).

A person’s current and future health will be determined by that.  It will also influence longevity and heavily influence quality of life in later years. We can also be totally unaware that our body is very stressed.

So what influences physiological stress?

– Traumatic memories, negative beliefs/interpretations (these are usually subconscious, so again we can be totally unaware of them).  WHO estimates that 85% of all illness is caused by stress.  Psychologists conclude that most stress is caused by unhelpful interpretations and/or actions in relation to those.  Consequently, this factor is probably the biggest influence on health and well being.

– Chronic lack of certain nutrients (macro or micro), which is far more common than realised, even in developed countries

– Eating too much (adequate nutrients but a balanced calorie intake is required)

– Excess adipose tissue or body fat

– Bacteria, virus, fungus (you can have a large pathogen load that is causing havoc that can be hard to detect for nearly all physicians, they can even be inside cells)

– Environmental toxins which can accumulate in tissues

– Too much or too little work

– Too much or too little physical exercise

– Bad habits and addictions

– And so on.

 

There are ways to successfully address all of these factors, but the point is that this is the make or break with health, well being, longevity and quality of life in later years.  These are the concrete issues.  I would say in most cases ‘everything in moderation’ will ignore these things, and so won’t do the job.

The longest lived and healthiest people in the world are the Okinawans.  They live on a secluded island off Japan.

They meditate and exercise daily, eat fish, chicken, seaweed, vegetables and rice from lands that they naturally replenish with nutrients.  They don’t overeat.  They also disregard treating symptoms with toxic pharmaceuticals and instead use natural medicines to help facilitate the body to heal itself without side effects.

Five times as many Okinawans live to be 100 years old as their compatriots elsewhere in Japan – and Japan has the highest life expectancy of any country.  Okinawans also usually die of old age and not from any disease (they have drastically different rates of illness and prolonged illness to the west). Therefore, they usually have a high quality of life right up to when they die.

They also have many fighters in their 90’s, who are still able to whoop guys half their age!  In other words, they also retain strength, speed and flexibility a lot more than their counterparts in other nations.

Could it be that they have a great weather system, are wealthy, have unique genes or are secluded from infectious diseases?

The weather is no different to lots of places.

Okinawa is poor – Japan’s poorest region in fact. It has had its fair share of hardship – it has been invaded many times over the centuries and suffered heavy losses in the second world war. Studies suggest that when they emigrate, Okinawans quickly lose their health advantages – which means it’s not about genetics.

Unfortunately, their lifestyle is also starting to change as other influences come into their culture.

However, if we go back to factors that cause physiological stress and successfully address those things we can mimic their results and even better them!

I go into these factors and how to address them in a lot more depth in my report, The Health and Energy Code, click here for more information.

Why you are probably very deficient in Magnesium and how it is critical to good health and sports performance

Picture a man living in a cottage in a forest, near a river.  He’s surrounded by the elements.  There’s a lot to be said for it.

Every day he eats fresh greens, he catches fish and eats them.  He exercises and does meditative type things that relax his mind and body.  His health is probably a lot better than most.

The reason being he’s getting what he needs to nourish, remove toxins and de-stress.

 

Regarding the nourishment part greens, fish and fresh mineral water are high in magnesium.  Most of us in the modern world are deficient in magnesium (many of us are severely deficient), and it is so important.  It is needed for regulating no less than 300 biochemical reactions in the body.

Magnesium deficiency is a significant factor — often the major factor — in many severe illnesses including heart attacks and other forms of heart disease, asthma, anxiety and panic attacks, depression, fatigue, diabetes, migraines and other headaches, osteoporosis, insomnia, and most cases of muscular problems.” Dr. Steven Johnson puts it better: “The range of pathologies associated with Mg deficiency is staggering: hypertension (cardiovascular disease, kidney and liver damage, etc.), peroxynitrite damage (migraine, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Alzheimer’s disease, etc.), recurrent bacterial infection due to low levels of nitric oxide in the cavities (sinuses, vagina, middle ear, lungs, throat, etc.), fungal infections due to a depressed immune system, thiamine deactivation (low gastric acid, behavioral disorders, etc.), premenstrual syndrome, Ca deficiency (osteoporosis, mood swings, etc.), tooth cavities, migraines, hearing loss, diabetes type II, cramps, muscle weakness, impotence, aggression, fibromas, K deficiency (arrhythmia, hypertension, some forms of cancer), Fe accumulation, etc.”

The modern diet contains water that has had many of the natural minerals taken out from treatment and recycling, and we eat far less greens and fish than before.  Also, a lot of the vegetables we do eat have come from land that is not fully remineralised, because most large farms use man-made fertilisers that are only high in the minerals that make crops grow bigger (and are deficient in the other macro minerals like Magnesium and all the micro minerals).

This issue has been compounded by rudimentary conventional magnesium testing that is actually inaccurate to your true magnesium levels.  Most doctors and laboratories don’t even test for it, and if they do they only look at the blood.  Only 1% of the body’s magnesium is in the blood, the rest is in the tissues.

So, the bottom line is most of us need to address this problem ourselves.  The first thing you can do is make sure you are eating more greens and fish.  If you have a lot of the symptoms of magnesium deficiency the second thing you can do is supplement.  Check after a number of weeks to see if it has benefited you.

Magnesium can be difficult to supplement because taking it orally is not the best way for it to absorb and at higher doses it also loosens the stools.  My advice is to supplement transdermally, rub it on your skin.  There is a oil/gel available from a company called Ancient Minerals.  Their products are available at ancient-minerals.com and magnesium.ie .  It’s very hard to overdose magnesium as most people are very deficient and excess is usually either not absorbed or removed from the body.

Ancient Minerals magnesium chloride is extracted from the Ancient Zechstein Seabed in Europe, 1600 to 2000 meters deep in the interior of the Earth. Well protected for the last 250 million years, it is the most pure magnesium in the world.

I’ve found this supplement fantastic in my own health and I’m sure it would of great benefit to most other people as well.

One other thing, magnesium increases Atp (energy, speed, stamina), is one of the best anti-inflammatories (if not the best) and helps your muscles to relax.  Do you think it might help your training, recovery and sports performance as well?

Don’t get left behind is my advice.  Lather that stuff all over your body before and after training (especially where it is most needed).

The man living in a cottage in the forest doesn’t have an iphone, but he’d probably kick all our butts in living in a way that makes him fit, healthy and happy.  Smartphones and the internet are great in some ways and we don’t have to live in a forest, but let’s be far more like that guy and not king of the rats in the rat race (the ill-health and death race).

Let’s get back to living in a way that is in tune with our nature!

Creatine: Is it good, and is it safe?

Creatine is one of the few very good supplements worth the money. It works to increase energy, muscle size and power.  It’s not uncommon to see increases of 10% in strength/power output and 8lbs of muscle gain from creatine alone.

My advice is to use creatine monohydrate. This is the most common and most researched form of the substance. It is also perfectly safe (according to the 150 research papers I’ve viewed on it). *See the end of this article for safe dosages and monitoring any reactions

There are other forms of creatine, creatine ethylester (CEE), that is broken down into creatinine, which is toxic to the body. I strongly suggest you avoid this type of creatine or anything other than creatine monohydrate, because this is the one we know works best and is also completely safe.

The buffered Ph neutral creatine called KreAlklyn is a madey uppey type of creatine. It is just mixed with creatine salts and baking soda. They then tell you that creatine monohydrate will be largely broken down into creatinine in the body, unless it is buffered like theirs is.

This is not true. Creatine monohydrate mixed with water is Ph neutral and very little degrades into creatinine (not enough to be significant in any way). Plus KreAlklyn is used at a much lower dose, because it is said to be ‘much more effective since it isn’t broken down’. Again, creatine monohydrate isn’t broken down into creatinine, except minutely. The research is sound on this, so therefore KreAlklyn is just giving a very small and ineffective dose of creatine monohydrate plus baking soda. It’s a cod.

Regarding other forms of creatine, they are either less effective or simply creatine monohydrate dressed up in a prettier dress (for probably double the price).

Regarding dosage, an effective dose of creatine can be anywhere up to 35g per day. A good guide would be your bodyweight target in pounds * 0.15 = grams of creatine per day.

Most people will be around the 20-25 grams per day range.

Creatine monohydrate is pretty cheap to buy and, in my opinion, definitely worth purchasing if you are an athlete or a regular gym goer.

You do hear about the so called dangers of creatine, so I am wary in that sense.  However, I have read a lot of research papers on creatine, so have scientists I trust and I don’t see the negatives people talk about. I only see positive effects in performance & cellular and mitochrondrial health.  I’ve also used it at various times and only experienced benefits. There were no negative effects in my creatinine levels or other markers of health.

It has to be considered that there are many conflicting pieces of information and strong negative views on every type of diet out there as well. Creatine is naturally occuring in foods, especially meat. It is simply three amino-acids, which are perfectly natural.

Also make sure you are buying from a reputable source.  I buy creatine monohydrate from myprotein.ie because they provide an independent certificate of analysis for label accuracy and purity, with every batch.  This ensures you are getting what you paid for and also that there are no contaminants.

You just have to see how you react to things, because everybody is different and not every diet or supplement will work for you. The best thing we can do is decide whether we want to try it, and if we do… experiment with safe dosages, see the results and monitor any potential downsides before and after, with a health professional.

Then you can decide whether you want to continue with it or not. It’s not the biggest deal in the world, training and diet are far more important. However, creatine can also make a significant enough difference to size and performance to warrant serious consideration as a training aid.

 

 

 

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Why not all research, or rather, not all interpretation of the research, is created equal.

This article is going to outline why you also have to use your own head, no matter how much of a supposed expert the person you are dealing with is.

I’m not into dogma, because it results in anything from lack of progression/innovation to downright incompetence. I always encourage people to write their own notes on any material and get their own experience. I think my writings are very well researched and tested, and they do get great results, but that’s not the point.

Every system has to evolve, get better and more accurate. Furthermore, each person who wants to master a subject can get a shortcut to the gold, but they won’t have any mastery until they’ve put their own perception and stamp on it.

For one thing you’ll have to tweak it to your own needs, goals, body, personality, capabilities and lifestyle. I really want to teach people to be their own coach.

Another big reason I do that is because that’s where the real progress and understanding comes from. When you really know the picture of things first hand you gain an extra level of motivation and vision for just how far you can get. It will also safeguard you against dogma that is inaccurate. You get a lot of experts who just rehash stuff, often information that was incorrect to begin with.

Some degree courses are teaching health and fitness information that is actually based on a business model and not science. In conventional medicine, for example, you have a setup where Doctors are taught to treat symptoms and not root causes. Plus they are using allopathic medicine, because it is the only licensed treatment. That was a policy made by government lobbies. Law was passed that you had to pay $20 million to get ‘official’ research. You can’t patent healing, natural substances the drugs are usually based on (without the side effects), penny on the dollar medicines or any other processes by which the body is aided in healing itself. Without the patent you can’t corner the market and make the $20 million back, so no one is going to do that. Also only large corporations can afford to outlay the initial $20 million anyway.

Therefore the system is not setup for the best results and science, it is setup for a monopoly and one particular type of medicine, which as it happens is very ineffective at curing people, 90% of the time. I’m not totally against pharmaceutical drugs because they can be useful, and in emergencies can save lives. However, with chronic illness they are largely a business con. They are very expensive, usually ineffective at curing, just treat the symptoms, have a lot of side effects (sometimes even causing death) and create repeat customers. I don’t want to be having a go at Doctors because in emergencies they save lives. This dogma is pushed on Doctors and they are a generally speaking a conservative bunch by nature, highly technical, strong at passing tests and carrying out the current system very well, for better or worse. There’s a lot of the worse around at the minute, unfortunately.

And not many of them are doing anything about it, but there are of course some doctors out there too who are brilliant at curing chronic illnesses as well.

We also have issues with independent research because it’s usually anything but. In 2002, the New England Journal of Medicine, one of the most respected journals of medicine, made a startling announcement. The editors declared that they were dropping their policy stipulating that authors of review articles of medical studies could not have financial ties to drug companies whose medicines were being analyzed. The reason? The journal could no longer find enough independent experts. Drug company gifts and consulting fees are so pervasive that in any given field, you cannot find an expert who has not been paid off in some way by the industry. So the journal settled for a new standard: Their reviewers can have received no more than $10,000 from companies whose work they judge.

So all the money coming into research, grants, education, medical seminars, FDA is all tied to big pharma. Plus the doctors are overwhelmingly being given this drug treatment picture in their training, a business model masquerading as good science.

Let’s get into the practicalities.

This is a typical situation: Take cholesterol issues, for example. A man goes to the doctor. The tests come back and his cholesterol is not in such good shape. The doctor tells him the only proven way to reduce his cholesterol is to go on a statin drug. This happened to a guy I know recently. I told him there was plenty of research that you could sort cholesterol issues out completely by reducing body fat, inflammation and improving fitness.  You do this with a decent diet plan, a supplement or two like omega 3 fish oil and a good workout plan. He said ‘sure I did that the last time I had high cholesterol, because the statin drugs made me feel awful before that and I went back and my tests were fine, plus I never felt better’. ‘There you go’ I said to him, I’ve seen that plenty of times myself as well.

Essentially the doctor had him on a dangerous drug proven to actually block the CoQ10 pathway, which is an important muscular energy nutrient. And guess which muscle requires it the most? Yes, the heart! Statin drugs might treat the symptoms of high cholesterol, but it’s not addressing the cause, which is inflammation (which causes arterial damage which is then repaired by cholesterol glueing it up). Inflammation is usually caused by stress, excessive adipose tissue (body fat), magnesium deficiency or a lack omega 3 in the diet.

So getting to the title of this article, not all research is created equal. The research says statins reduce cholesterol. Blood thinner medication thins blood. But they are addressing the symptom, not the cause. And they have many bad side effects. Blood thinning medication is similar in make up to rat poison, I lie you not. They actually use rat poison in the army at times during emergencies, which is fine, I mean you use what you have at the time. However, someone taking that everyday, that’s BAD science.

It’s completely missing the big picture. Conventional medicine and the west is obsessed with details (left brained) to the point that it is easily duped by business. The big picture (using the right brain) and other important details are completely missed. The Chinese and other Eastern medical doctors find this laughable, and rightly so.

You have to get to why the person has high blood pressure and address that. Otherwise, just giving a drug is going to leave the problem unabated and health degrades. Often people end up on 2-8 different drugs per day and in a nightmare situation with their health. The result of all of the above is that illness is increasing at all ages in the most ‘developed’ countries in the world (WHO statistics). It’s absolute madness, not to mention the costs involved, which is just more money going directly from the taxpayers pocket to the rich corporate owner’s coffers.

This ignorance helps the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.

It’s a total nonsense. And it all starts with dogma.

Regarding fitness, there was a study published about interval training being nine times more effective than steady state (jogging or similar) for fat loss. Turns out the reality in the study and not the notes, was that the participants had lost 1mm extra at nine different points of the body. That’s a minor amount better, overall, nowhere near the claimed amount.

When we look at what the research really says and test things out for ourselves we start to work out the big picture and the details. We have first hand mastery, not dogma from someone else, who may have their own inaccurate conclusions or even an agenda. Intervals are not nine times more effective, they are slightly more effective for fat loss. Overall, however, both together is even better because you can’t do intervals too often or you burn out.

So you can have research that is twisted up or ignoring other large factors, or not taking the big picture into account and more. Also, no one can fully understand you, your life, your circumstances, health, personality etc. like you can.

Listen to people who get results and speak sense, but also be your own coach! It’s a guard against the epic fail and it’s the only way to great success!

Why most vegetable oils are not good for you

We have a diet that is imbalanced to omega 6 fatty acids, instead of omega 3. Nearly all vegetable oils are rich in omega 6. We need that too, but we already get plenty of it from food. We don’t get enough omega 3 and they are anti-inflammatory. Too much omega 6 is pro-inflammatory. Inflammation causes problems with cholesterol, cardiovascular issues, pain, joint issues and all sorts of other goodies.

That’s why fish oil is recommended so often, because it gives you plenty of omega 3’s in the direct form of DHA (which doesn’t have to be broken down).

You should also try to limit any other oils you take, because they are probably omega 6. Olive oil in a small amount is good, because it is omega 9 and those help the cell membranes, but we tend to be okay for omega 9 anyway.

Also, vegetable oils that are omega 3, like Flax seed oil, are basically useless because the enzymes needed to break them down are usually tied up with all the other fats we assimilate.

That’s why it is best to supplement with fish oil.

A good vegetable oil to use is coconut oil. It doesn’t need to be broken down and although it’s not addressing the omega fatty acid balance either way, it is a great source of energy. It enters the system straight away and actually aids fat burning. It helps the body to use fat for fuel, and especially in the first half of the day, it can also aid the body in mobilising and burning body fat (by processes described in the book).

It also contains stearic acid, as does bacon, which is very good for cell membranes.

Granma knew best when she gave you bacon and eggs.

Despite the publicity, the real science says animal fat is good for you and vegetable fats are often a problem creator. I wouldn’t go crazy on the saturated fat because although it is good for you (also good for cell membranes), too much of it can cause cell membranes to get too rigid, but that’s at a crazy amount. It’s not a huge worry. However, fish or chicken without skin is sometimes better than beef.

There are also warnings about dietary cholesterol, but blood cholesterol gets high from inflammation and not directly not from diet.

Diet does play a large role, but indirectly.

The main cause of inflammation is excess body fat and an imbalance of too much omega 6 in the diet (not enough omega 3). Plus, excess body fat is ironically not caused by too much fat in the diet, but too many carbs. Body fat is stored via insulin, which is stimulated by carbs. Carbohydrates are bad if not used correctly. They are what we need to watch and the omega 6 vegetable fat, not the animal fat.

The best diet for health and fat loss is described very well at www.precisionphysique.com/carbbackloading.html

What are good body measurements?

There are actually body measurements that are ideal for your height and gender.

And they are attainable long term for anybody with the right training and diet.

They are also not the stereotypes you often see on the front of a bodybuilding or fashionista magazine. Those dudes are often too big and the girls are often too skinny.

That’s not just what I am saying, that is what the maths is saying as well. There is a number throughout nature called Phi, or the perfect ratio. It is the design number. It is in everything from seashells, to plants, to animals, to humans. It is also used in roads, buildings, credit cards, cars, cereal boxes and lots of other things to make them structurally sounder, more visually appealing and to sell more.

Nearly all the great physique statues are on these numbers as well. We discuss the numbers in depth in our book, Precision Physique.

The extremes don’t look right, it is commercialism to try to get people after the unattainable (and actually undesirable), so they will keep buying magazines, the supplements they own, the clothes they advertise and so on.

The young people who are hell bent on getting the drug induced physiques in the pictures end up shooting steroids or with eating disorders. Not good.

So it is not just interesting information to talk about the correct health and physique goals, but it is actually very important information.

There’s nothing worse than a lean girl thinking she would look better if she was skin and bone. Her health, life and even appearance will end up in bits.

The idiots who perpetuate this madness (in the images and articles they write) need to be called out. Hopefully then eventually everyone will be aware of it and then no younger people will want to buy the stupid mags anymore (until they start publishing good material).