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Archive for April, 2015

Why you are probably very deficient in Magnesium and how it is critical to good health and sports performance

Picture a man living in a cottage in a forest, near a river.  He’s surrounded by the elements.  There’s a lot to be said for it.

Every day he eats fresh greens, he catches fish and eats them.  He exercises and does meditative type things that relax his mind and body.  His health is probably a lot better than most.

The reason being he’s getting what he needs to nourish, remove toxins and de-stress.

 

Regarding the nourishment part greens, fish and fresh mineral water are high in magnesium.  Most of us in the modern world are deficient in magnesium (many of us are severely deficient), and it is so important.  It is needed for regulating no less than 300 biochemical reactions in the body.

Magnesium deficiency is a significant factor — often the major factor — in many severe illnesses including heart attacks and other forms of heart disease, asthma, anxiety and panic attacks, depression, fatigue, diabetes, migraines and other headaches, osteoporosis, insomnia, and most cases of muscular problems.” Dr. Steven Johnson puts it better: “The range of pathologies associated with Mg deficiency is staggering: hypertension (cardiovascular disease, kidney and liver damage, etc.), peroxynitrite damage (migraine, multiple sclerosis, glaucoma, Alzheimer’s disease, etc.), recurrent bacterial infection due to low levels of nitric oxide in the cavities (sinuses, vagina, middle ear, lungs, throat, etc.), fungal infections due to a depressed immune system, thiamine deactivation (low gastric acid, behavioral disorders, etc.), premenstrual syndrome, Ca deficiency (osteoporosis, mood swings, etc.), tooth cavities, migraines, hearing loss, diabetes type II, cramps, muscle weakness, impotence, aggression, fibromas, K deficiency (arrhythmia, hypertension, some forms of cancer), Fe accumulation, etc.”

The modern diet contains water that has had many of the natural minerals taken out from treatment and recycling, and we eat far less greens and fish than before.  Also, a lot of the vegetables we do eat have come from land that is not fully remineralised, because most large farms use man-made fertilisers that are only high in the minerals that make crops grow bigger (and are deficient in the other macro minerals like Magnesium and all the micro minerals).

This issue has been compounded by rudimentary conventional magnesium testing that is actually inaccurate to your true magnesium levels.  Most doctors and laboratories don’t even test for it, and if they do they only look at the blood.  Only 1% of the body’s magnesium is in the blood, the rest is in the tissues.

So, the bottom line is most of us need to address this problem ourselves.  The first thing you can do is make sure you are eating more greens and fish.  If you have a lot of the symptoms of magnesium deficiency the second thing you can do is supplement.  Check after a number of weeks to see if it has benefited you.

Magnesium can be difficult to supplement because taking it orally is not the best way for it to absorb and at higher doses it also loosens the stools.  My advice is to supplement transdermally, rub it on your skin.  There is a oil/gel available from a company called Ancient Minerals.  Their products are available at ancient-minerals.com and magnesium.ie .  It’s very hard to overdose magnesium as most people are very deficient and excess is usually either not absorbed or removed from the body.

Ancient Minerals magnesium chloride is extracted from the Ancient Zechstein Seabed in Europe, 1600 to 2000 meters deep in the interior of the Earth. Well protected for the last 250 million years, it is the most pure magnesium in the world.

I’ve found this supplement fantastic in my own health and I’m sure it would of great benefit to most other people as well.

One other thing, magnesium increases Atp (energy, speed, stamina), is one of the best anti-inflammatories (if not the best) and helps your muscles to relax.  Do you think it might help your training, recovery and sports performance as well?

Don’t get left behind is my advice.  Lather that stuff all over your body before and after training (especially where it is most needed).

The man living in a cottage in the forest doesn’t have an iphone, but he’d probably kick all our butts in living in a way that makes him fit, healthy and happy.  Smartphones and the internet are great in some ways and we don’t have to live in a forest, but let’s be far more like that guy and not king of the rats in the rat race (the ill-health and death race).

Let’s get back to living in a way that is in tune with our nature!

Gymnasts don’t use reps, sets and 3 days a week routines

I’m all for knowing a lot of the science behind getting the most from your training, but it’s not the most important factor.

The most important factor is just training, a LOT.  If you do that you’ll know what works for you and why anyway.  Then you can start to read a few books and educate yourself.  You can try things out and see how it goes for you.

When you are starting though you just need to get going, try just about anything.  See what effect it has.

When gymnasts train they just do the moves, and do them for hours everyday.

gymnast

Trainers nowadays are chronically afraid of overtraining, but that’s often due to doing ridiculous things that you know you shouldn’t be doing anyway.

It’s hard to overtrain using bodyweight exercises, and that’s not to say they don’t get to extremely high resistance, because they do with using one arm or difficult leverage points like handstand push ups etc.  The more natural the training the better because involving all the smaller muscles, skill, coordination and balance engages the brain more, which hugely improves results and also recovery.  Static contractions, kettlebells, bodyweight exercise, some weights exercises and playing sport are ‘natural training’.  The body is amazing at adapting to hard and regular training after a few weeks, especially if it is a sport or natural types of training.

If you just commit to training everyday or almost everyday, over time, you’ll work out how much and how hard to train.

You can also read up on sets and reps and try things out.

My point here is that a lot of people are getting caught up in the how and forgetting the main factor is to keep taking action.  The person who just keeps doing the training and improving his/her strength (even if they do it ‘wrong’) will end up getting way better results than the person who does all the reps and sets to a tee, but doesn’t push hard enough to improve regularly and turns up sporadically.

Those fellas that exercise on the monkey bars just go and train every day or every second day and do the best they can.  They aim to get better, and do so regularly.  They usually are training 6-12 months before they show any interest in the science of it, if they ever do.  Either way, they end up with amazing strength, athleticism and ripped muscular physiques.

So I’m going to break down for you what is really important:  Train a lot, train as naturally as possible and aim to improve at it regularly.  That’s it.

The rest of it is just fine tuning.